So, why Work the World?

As part of my blog series about my Cambodian elective, I want to talk a little bit about why I chose to go with Work the World.

 

No age requirement: some of the companies I had considered had certain age limits – you had to be under the age of around twenty five, which wasn’t great from my perspective as students come at every age, especially in midwifery. So straight away anywhere with age limits was ruled out, meaning that Work the World was ruled in!

 

The WtW team: I love questions. I love answers even more. And the enquiries team were brilliant at getting back to me quickly and helping me to figure out as many details as I could before I booked. (L, if you’re reading this, thank you!) After I booked, WtW had a student coordinator give me a call to go through all the details of my booking and answer all of my questions.

 

Location, location, location: right back when I started dreaming this whole adventure up, I knew I wanted to go east. I thought about India, Sri Lanka, Thailand, places like that. But for some reason I kept being drawn back to the idea of going to Cambodia. So while I did do a bit of dithering on the website, flicking between different beautiful pictures of all of these WtW locations, I went with my heart and chose Cambodia.

 

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Price: I’d be lying if I said price didn’t play a big part in my choice. Cambodia was one of the lower priced options on the WtW list. Being a student, a realistic price was probably as important as how much I actually wanted to go to a location.

 

Ethics: this was a pretty major factor. I’m very aware of the “white saviour” complex, and “volun-tourism”. I did not want this trip to just be about my learning and my life experience and my dream. I wanted to make sure that my experience wouldn’t be at the expense of other people. The people are the most important. So, I was really relieved to read that Work the World has a strong ethos when working with their partner hospitals. They pay the hospital for every student they take. They donate equipment regularly, liaising with hospitals every few months to see what they need most. They also buy from and employ locals as much as possible so that money flows back into the communities.

 

These reasons all pointed me towards Work the World as the right team to help me on this journey to my dream. Keep an eye on the blog for my next post about this adventure, or go to our facebook page!

 

The current fundraiser is Laura’s SAVE OR SHAVE  

https://www.gofundme.com/shave-or-save-for-work-the-world&rcid=r01-153027137226-3d88d7ed65584217&pc=ot_co_campmgmt_w

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Student Midwife Life: Orientation week

Hello, dear readers! It’s been a crazy few weeks between registering for college, meeting classmates, and shopping, packing and moving to Dundalk . But things are starting to settle down now, which is brilliant, because in all honesty I am completely exhausted. I know, I know, if I’m exhausted now what will I be like at the end of the semester? I’ve missed solid routine though, and it’s close now.

 

 

I actually missed the first day. I was coming back from a wedding, and toddled up to Dundalk in the evening. I was honestly sick with nerves and excitement. I was fidgeting all over my room, packing and unpacking and rearranging my bag. I almost forgot to set my alarm, it was a near disaster!

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But all went off without a hitch. I got up nice and early, relaxed with my morning mocha, did my makeup, and headed off. I have to say, if it hadn’t been for getting to know a few other mature students before I went in I would have been a wreck. It was such a relief to walk into my building and be greeted with smiles and familiar faces. Even walking in with my friend was so much easier than walking in alone. If you can get to know people beforehand, DO IT!

 

We had lots of talks (in the whole 130 person first year group) and icebreakers (in the group of 20 midwives). We had a scavenger hunt across the campus, lunches together, visits from union reps, and lots of talks from occupational health, the placement office, and student services. We went through booklists, how to access Moodle, some college policies, and what to expect in the course. There’s always an overwhelming amount of information to take in on orientation week, but it always makes me glad that DkIT is a small campus, it’s impossible to get lost for very long. Already it feels like home again, and I don’t think I could be happier!

 

Now, on Thursday, I had to miss another day. This was a big day. While the rest of my midwifery group were getting fitted for their uniforms and finishing the next step in their Garda Vetting (which I’ll be catching up on as this post goes live), I was getting my McDonald’s Scholarship. €1000 for an essay on improving service for customers – I wrote about breastfeeding families and families with additional needs (despite never needing them, I’m always sad when I see disabled bathrooms with no proper facility for people above the age of two). It was a great morning, up in the Celtic Suite of Croke Park with my franchise owners, my family, my partner, and the other winners. We had a lovely lunch, lots of pictures taken, and I managed to not fall out of the stands. I’ve had fantastic support from my store and my franchise since day one, so it was nice to celebrate with them and talk about what’s up next. I was hoping to be sent pictures by this morning but I’ll post them as soon as I have them!

 

That’s pretty much it for my first week as a student midwife. Starting as I mean to go on, as busy as possible! Have you just started a new course, or gone back? Let me know how you’re getting on in the comments

 

Day of the Midwife 2017

Screenshot 2017-05-05 at 07.11.10Happy International Day of the Midwife to all of you! Whether you’ve just discovered your passion, you’re applying for a place, you’re a current student, a qualified midwife or a retired one. Today is a day to celebrate the magic we are a part of.

I’ve been thinking about what midwifery means to me. Firstly, it means hard work. Three years of applying, and four years of working my butt off to get the grades, and now to get the money together. It has been a long journey just to get to the starting line, but I am just four months away from my first day as a student midwife!

4415-8_midwifery_serviceMidwifery is a science, requiring a lot of academic commitment and hours spent with your head in a book or a journal. Midwifery is an art, a beautiful privilege for those who practice it. Each family needs to be looked like a separate but equally important piece of art. They require detail, individual attention, and time.

 

Midwifery is a struggle. It is physically difficult, bent down to observe the person in whatever position contractions have put them in. It is emotionally draining, because everyone has problems and we are there to help.

But most of all, midwifery is a gift. We are a part of people’s proudest and most important moments. We are the person they call when baby does something to worry them. We are the trusted heart and hands.

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I can’t lie, I got very emotional watching Sheena Byrom’s video this morning, which includes messages from midwives all over the world. It really got me thinking: we’re one of the oldest professions in the world. We are a part of every culture across the globe, in one form or another. We’re a strong community of people that are there 24/7 every day of the year. We are so vital.

 

So here’s to us! The midwives of the world, with woman no matter the outcomes. How are you celebrating today? ❀